Abundance and Resilience: Farming and Foraging in Ancient Kauaʻi

Abundance and Resilience: Farming and Foraging in Ancient Kauaʻi

$28.00

Julie S. Field, Michael W. Graves

262 pp.

For researchers, Nu'alolo Kai opened up the world of everyday life of indigenous Hawaiians between AD 1400 and 1900. More importantly, we learn how their procurement and utilization of animals―wild marine organisms and birds, as well as domesticated dogs and pigs―affected local resources. Demonstrating that an increased preference for introduced animals, such as dogs and pigs, effectively limited negative impacts on wild animal resources, the essays in Abundance and Resilience collectively argue that the Hawaiian community of Nu'alolo Kai practiced a sustainable form of animal resource procurement and management for five centuries.